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Thursday, July 07, 2016

All Is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walker

All Is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walker.   A lot of people are going to love this one, but I didn't. 

Fifteen-year-old Jenny Kramer is brutally raped at a party, then given a controversial drug that will make her forget.  Chapter One is pretty rough.  Really rough.

(This drug is undergoing clinical trials, and once more, presents a lot of questions about science and ethics.  It may offer hope to people with traumatic events in their pasts, and it is touted as a hopeful treatment for soldiers with PTSD, but many are still skeptical about long-term benefits.
It also opens up plenty of avenues for abuse.)

In the novel, Jenny is given the drug at the hospital where she is going to require extensive surgery.  Later when interviewed, she cannot remember anything about the rape, and the police have little to go on.  Initially, things appear to be going well, Jenny remembers nothing about the horrific experience, but months later, she attempts suicide.  Even though Jenny cannot remember the rape, something remains in her mind and body.

At this point, she and her parents begin seeing Dr. Forrest, a psychiatrist who takes particular interest in Jenny's case.  Unreliable narrator!  Twist, then twist back.

When I finished, I still could not make sense of several things.  Spoilers:  Why send two of his patients like guided missiles to someone he set up?  What creepy part of himself needed Jenny to be his companion in his own traumatic rape?  If he knew Glen was responsible from the beginning, why was he worried about his son? He even cures Glen--sorta.   So many things simply did not parse.  

This was an ARC that arrived in the mail, and the film rights have been sold to Warner Bros. 

Once again, I think the Kirkus Review  has the right of this one:  "A repugnant narrator, even an unreliable one, makes it difficult to focus on the true victim, one who is crushed under the weight of this ridiculous plot."

ARC  read in June.  Blog review scheduled for July 7.

Psychological Thriller.  July 12, 2016.  319 pages.  




10 comments:

  1. I considered reading this one, but decided against it. Just the description of it doesn't sit well with me. I can see why this might make for good thriller fodder, but I think it might be too uncomfortable fo me. So your not liking it is only more reason not to read it.

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    1. I'm not sure I would have chosen it, but when it arrived in the mail, I decided to give it a try. It will be a hot book, however, and Reese Witherspoon bought the film rights for WB.

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  2. Doesn't sound like my kind of book; thanks for the warning. :)

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    1. I wasn't happy with it, but like all reading, it is such a personal thing.

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  3. Well, I have this one to read soon or at least try to read. We shall see. I'm not sure I agree with a drug to erase experiences, traumatic or not. We are all the melding of our paths in life. I can't imagine a drug 'erasing' an attack. Food for thought and as I said, we shall see how I fare.

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    1. Sometimes good intentions go awry, and I can see that possibility with a drug that "deletes" memory. I hope you are better satisfied with the book that I was, Kay!

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  4. The premise sounds interesting but the idea of the drug and what it could do doesn't make this an appealing read to me. I'm curious how the film will turn out and the reactions of the viewers.

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    1. I hope the film gives a little more insight to some of the loose ends. I "get" that we are supposed to see what the Dr. believes he has accomplished, but it still doesn't work for me. Not that I would watch the film after reading the book. :(

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  5. I skipped the spoilers part in case I get to this one soon but I am kind of intrigued by this one. Adding it to my TBR list!

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    1. :) I'll be looking for your review!

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